Dog Profile Of The Week – Basset Hound

Despite its low height of under 15 inches, the basset hound is a medium to large dog, weighing in at anywhere from 40 pounds for a small female Basset Houndsto 80 pounds for a large male (18 to 36 kilograms).

Bassets are very heavy-boned dogs with a large body on fairly short legs. Because they are bulky, bassets are slow maturing dogs, often not reaching full size until two years old. Bassets are immediately recognizable by their short, crooked legs, their long hanging ears and their large heads with hanging lips, sad expressive eyes, and wrinkled foreheads. The tail curves up and is carried somewhat gaily. The body is long and with the short legs gives bassets a rectangular appearance. The basset has a nice short, tight coat, with no long hair on legs or tail. Colors most commonly seen are tricolor or red and white but any hound color is acceptable.

Personality:

The basset hound is a friendly, easygoing dog. Originally hunting in packs, they tend to be good with other dogs and other pets in general. Bassets are people oriented and get along well with children. Fairly smart dogs, bassets are not easy to train as they are somewhat stubborn. A firm, patient hand with plenty of creativity is required to bring out the best in them. Bassets can be serious barkers and with their sturdy feet and nails they tend to be diggers. The hunting urge is still quite strong and if not safely confined they will go off hunting on their own.

Living With:

Basset hounds need a firm person in charge of their feeding as they have a definite tendency to become obese, which can cause serious problems with their long backs. Bassets are not high-powered athletes who need to run every day, but they should have a good long walk at least once daily to keep them fit. Most bassets live to 12 or 13 years.

Having developed as pack animals, basset hounds do feel a need for company and are happiest when they have their families around. They are not great watchdogs. Although they may bark, but they then greet strangers happily. The loose lips lead to a fair amount of drooling and many owners keep towels strategically placed around the house for cleanup. Bassets left alone to their own devices can easily become nuisance barkers or diggers. Bassets are fairly intelligent dogs, but they are not the easiest to train. Start training right off with puppies and do plenty of positive training to keep them interested. They enjoy tracking and hunting, even if only as a casual pastime. Grooming is fairly quick and easy and involves just a swipe with a brush once or twice a week. In between groomings, the basset may track a great deal of mud or dirt into the house because of their low stature and big feet.

History:

The basset hound comes from as far back as the 1500s when the pre-revolutionary French were using low slung, heavy-bodied hounds to trail rabbits. The word “bas” is French for “low” befitting the basset hound’s stature. A number of the short, bowlegged French hunting dogs and the basset hound we recognize today were fine-tuned in England in the 1800s. With the exception of height and leg conformation, they are similar to the St. Hubert’s hound.

Bassets were selected not only for their outstanding scenting skills, but also because hunters could keep up with the slow-paced dogs. They not only hunted rabbits and hares, but were also sometimes used to track larger wounded game.
In the United States, the Basset quickly moved on from hunting dog to family pet. Familiarized to the public by cartoons, such as “Fred the Basset,” and in commercials, such as Hush Puppies™ shoes, the basset hound is now primarily a companion dog.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

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Dog Profile Of The Week – German Shepherd

German shepherd dogs reach a maximum of about 25 inches in height, and they weigh up to about 95 pounds (41 kilograms).

He is a well-proportioned dog. The head is broad and tapers handsomely to a sharp muzzle. The ears are rather large and stand erect. The back is level and muscular, and German Shepherdthe tail is bushy and curves downward. The coat is thick and rough and may be black, tan, black and tan or gray. The coat should be harsh and of medium length; however, long-coated individuals occur often.

The breed lives about 10-12 years.

Personality:

German shepherd dogs get along well with children and other pets if raised with them, but in keeping with their guarding instincts, they tend to be leery of strangers.

The breed is considered to be smart and easy to train.

Some poorly bred German shepherd dogs can be high-strung and nervous. Coupled with poor socialization and inadequate training, over guarding and aggressive behavior are risks.

Living With:

Because German shepherd dogs are large and powerful and have strong guarding instincts, great care should be taken to purchase German shepherds from reputable breeders. Poorly bred dogs are more likely to be nervous.

To prevent over guarding and aggressive behavior, German shepherd dogs should be carefully socialized from a young age and be obedience trained. They should be with the family and continually exposed under supervision to people and other pets around the neighborhood; they should not be confined to a kennel or backyard either alone or with other dogs.

German shepherd dogs are active and like to have something to do. They need ample exercise daily; otherwise, they can get into mischief or become high-strung.

The dog sheds heavily about twice yearly, and the rest of the time sheds a lesser amount continually. To control shedding and keep the coat nice, brush at least a few times a week.

History:

German shepherd dogs are, as their name implies, a breed that originated in Germany. They were developed beginning in the late 1800s by crossing various herding breeds. The breed was subjected to stringent selection and it progressed quickly. In the United Kingdom, the dogs are known as Alsatians because fanciers of the breed there wanted to protect the dog from anti-German sentiments after World War I.

German shepherd dogs were introduced in the United States by soldiers returning home from World War I. The breed caught the public eye because of movie stars Strongheart and later, Rin Tin Tin. By World War II German shepherd dogs were the military breed of choice. The first guide dogs were German shepherd dogs. Today, they are one of the most popular dogs in America. In 1999, German shepherd dogs were third on the American Kennel Club’s list of the Top 50 Breeds.

The German shepherd dog is a herding breed known for its courage, loyalty and guarding instincts. This breed makes an excellent guard dog, police dog, military dog, guide dog for the blind and search and rescue dog. For many families, the German shepherd is also a treasured family pet.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com.

 

Dog Profile Of The Week – Havanese

Havanese are small dogs weighing seven to 13 pounds. The height ranges from 8 1/2 to 11 1/2 inches at the shoulder. The body is longer than tall; Havanesethey have drop ears and a tail that curls over the back. Havanese generally mature at 1 year of age, although they reach their full size around 6 to 8 months.

The Havanese coat is straight or wavy. This dog was often called the “Havana silk dog” because the coat, while double-coated, feels like fine silk. The adult coat reaches a length of six to eight inches. Unlike the bichon, the Havanese comes in many colors including gold, black, blue, silver, cream, champagne, chocolate and any combination of the acceptable colors including tricolor and parti-color.

Personality:

Havanese are affectionate and happy dogs. They do not make good kennel dogs and prefer being with their owners. They are active dogs and enjoy learning tricks and playing games with their owners.

Havanese are intelligent and trainable. They need socialization to prevent them from becoming timid with strangers.

Living With:

Havanese need a large amount of interaction with people. They are generally good with other pets if properly socialized, and they enjoy outside activities.

The Havanese can be a good watchdog but poor guard dog because of the small size. Occasionally, one may bark excessively if not properly trained.

Havanese require brushing and combing three or more times a week to ensure a mat-free coat. They do not require trimming.

The Havanese breed is ideal for a person who wants a small, active dog who does not require a large yard and can be contented with frequent walks and games of fetch. These dogs do not do well left alone for long periods.

Havanese typically live from 10 to 15 years.

History:

The Havanese is an old breed from the bichon family. Originally, Tenerife dogs came to Cuba with Spanish farmers and noblemen in the early 1500s. These dogs developed into the Havanese with little, if any, outside influences.

In Havana, the breed became a family pet. By the 18th century, Europeans vacationing in Havana discovered the Havanese. The little dog quickly became a hit among Spanish, French and British nobility.

With Castro’s revolution, some Cubans who fled to the United States brought their Havanese with them. These 11 dogs became the foundation stock for the Havanese of today. The Havanese is the most recent admission to the American Kennel Club’s Toy Group.

Dog Profile Of The Week – Border Collie

Border collies are medium-sized dogs.

Males stand as tall as 22 inches and weigh up to about 45 pounds (20 kilograms). Females stand as tall as 21 inches and weigh up to about 42 pounds (19 kilograms).Border Collie

They look like a lighter-weight Australian shepherd, but instead of the bobtail characteristic of the Aussie, border collies have a feathered tail that reaches to the hocks. The head is like that of a collie, and the body is slightly longer than the dog is tall. The ears stand but the tips drop over, giving them a jaunty appearance.

Some border collies have a coarse coat about three inches long, while others have a sleek coat about one inch long. A variety of colors are seen including black and white, red and white, black and gray, all black and tri-color. The longer-haired border collie usually has a lush mane and tail.

Personality:

Border collies are active, working dogs best suited to country living. If confined without activity and company, these dogs can become unhappy and destructive. The breed is highly intelligent, learns quickly and responds well to praise.

Because of their herding instincts, they are protective of their family and territory and make excellent watchdogs. They will look out for the family kids. Although they get along well with children and other pets they are raised with, they can be reserved and sometimes snappish with strangers, nipping at the heels the same way they would nip at sheep if herding.

Living With:

Border collies are extremely energetic dogs and must have the opportunity to get lots of exercise. They love to run. They also need ample attention from their owners and a job to do, whether that be herding livestock or fetching a ball.

They should be socialized well from the time they are young to prevent shyness around strangers, and they should have obedience training, which can help deter nipping behavior and a tendency to run off or chase cars.

Border collies are considered average shedders. Brushing at least weekly is needed to keep the coat nice. This breed lives about 12 to 15 years.

History:

Border collies are herders and were bred to work sheep, but they can manage just about any type of herd and will even herd children in the family.

The breed originated in the lowland and border counties of England and Scotland and may date back to the 1700s. The ancestors of the border collie are thought to be other types of collies, such as the bearded collie and Scotch collie, and some breed historians believe spaniel might be in the mix somewhere.

During the 19th century, border collies became popular among English gentry. Today, they are still used for working livestock and are family pets. Because they train easily, border collies are also used for police work, narcotics and bomb detection and for search and rescue missions. They also make good guide dogs for the blind. Borders have recently entered AKC show rings amid controversy and protests from fanciers who worry breeding for appearance may compromise working ability.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

Dog Profile Of The Week – Keeshond

The Keeshond (pronounced KAYZ-hawnd) is a double-coated breed. This coat consists of a woolly undercoat and a longer guard coat. The undercoat is a pale gray or cream color and the outer guard hairs are a mixture of gray and black with black tips. Twice a year, Keeshonden “blow,”Keeshond or shed their undercoats completely. This intense shedding period can last up to three weeks. Keeshonden appear larger than they really are because of their full, thick coat.

The average height of a mature Keeshond (over 2 years old) is 17″ for females and 18″ for males. The weight is ideally between 36 and 40 pounds. Except during the time of shedding, the keeshond coat is fairly easy to care for. Daily brushing is ideal, but once or twice per week will help to keep the coat clean and remove any loose undercoat.

In addition to their beautiful coats, Keeshonden are recognized for their alert, smiling expression and the distinctive “spectacles,” which are lightly shaded lines slanting upward from the outer portion of the eye to the lower corner of the ears.

Personality:

The natural tendencies of the Keeshond are such that no special training is usually needed for them to act as an alert watchdog. They rarely bite, however, and once a person is welcomed into the home, the keeshond will readily accept them.

The keeshond is friendly by nature to both people and other dogs. Their demand for affection is high, and they prefer to be included with the family rather than be left outside on their own. Keeshonden both bark and “talk.” The alert keeshond barks a warning that a stranger is near, but rarely are they nuisance barkers.

Living With:

Keeshonden are handsome, intelligent dogs with a delightful personality. Their playful, affectionate nature makes them ideal family pets. Unlike other northern breeds, the Keeshonden are relatively easy to train.

Rarely are they nuisance barkers, but they will bark a warning that a stranger is near. A keeshond is most happy if allowed to live in the home with the family, his “pack.” The ideal situation, of course, is one in which the dog can come in and out of the house on its own, through a dog door.

Keeshonden can remain outside in cold weather, but appropriate shelter should be provided. Because of their thick coats a hot, humid climate is not recommended.

History:

The keeshond (pronounced KAYZ-hawnd) is an old breed used for centuries as a family companion and watchdog. Many Keeshonden could be found living on the barges and farms in Holland where their masters depended on them for controlling the vermin population as well as providing loyal companionship.

A longtime resident of Holland, the Keeshond became the symbol of the Patriot Party in the 18th century. The name comes from the leader of this group, Kees De Gyselaer. This is the basis for the breed name as “Kees’ dog” in Dutch would be “Kees hund.”

The original Keeshond probably descended from the same arctic strains that produced the samoyed, spitz and Norwegian elkhound. The dog’s gentleness and devotion suggest that he was never intended as a hunting dog, but rather as a companion.

Today, the Keeshond continues to be regarded as a loyal house pet and an outgoing “people dog.”

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

 

Great Pet Product Savings In The Month Of May

 

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*Note – Coupon will be applied at time of purchase.

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* $12.00 Rebate from Merial When you purchase 12 pack of Heartgard

 

 

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

 

Dog Profile Of The Week – Pug

Pugs are members of the toy group despite their solid appearance.

They range in height from 10 to 11 inches and in weight from 14 to 18 pounds (six to eight kilograms). They are square dogs with Pugsubstantial limbs. Pugs are the sturdiest dogs of the toy group, befitting their mastiff heritage.

Pugs are known for their large, round heads, with the shortened muzzles and extensive forehead wrinkles. The vertical wrinkle on the forehead is said to resemble the Chinese character for “prince” and thus known as the “prince mark.” The eyes protrude somewhat, making them prone to trauma. The tail curls tightly over the hip.

They have a short, but very dense double coat. Colors can range from apricot to fawn, silver and black. All but the black dogs have a dark mask and ears with a trace of darkening down the back. The ears feel like black velvet.

Personality:

Pugs are not the lively socialites that some of the toy breeds are. They are a bit more serious, with a dry sense of humor. The breed motto is “multum in parvo,” meaning a lot in a little, with plenty of dog in a small package. Pugs can be stubborn but normally want to please.

These are fairly laid-back dogs, not usually given to extensive barking, digging or chewing. Pugs tend to get along well with other dogs and are sturdy enough to get along with children. They enjoy company and can be quite affectionate. True to their grouping, they are good companion dogs.

Living With:

Pugs are extremely easy to keep and have a serious tendency to become obese unless their diet and exercise are watched carefully. With the short muzzle, they do not do well in hot, humid weather and must be observed carefully for heatstroke. Pugs do tend to snore, again a result of the short muzzle. The prominent eyes are easily injured and care must be taken to keep them moist. Pugs are fairly robust and often live to 14 or 15 years of age.

Pugs do best with some daily exercise to help with their weight problems. Despite their heroic alarm years ago, they are not usually great watchdogs, preferring instead to greet newcomers with a wagging tail. Pugs should be socialized to keep that outgoing temperament, and they do well with other pets.

Grooming is important, both for the shedding from the dense coat and to keep facial wrinkles clean. A quick daily grooming, even a swipe with a hound mitt, usually suffices for the coat and a gentle wiping with a wet cloth for the face.

History:

While the pug is often associated with Holland, the breed originated in China, probably bred down from one of the local mastiff-type dogs. The little dogs with the round heads and expressive facial wrinkles were then transported to Holland via trading ships of the Dutch East India Company. In 1572, a pug sounded the alarm that saved Prince William from the approaching Spanish soldiers, and the breed forever after was tied to the royal House of Orange.

Napoleon’s wife had a pet pug, and the duke and duchess of Windsor had a pug as a royal companion. Victorian England took on pugs as the latest rage in canine fashion and many pugs can be spotted in paintings of that era.

The word “pug” may come from the Latin “pugnus” for fist, possibly describing the round face and head. The name does not fit the breed’s temperament, because these are not really guard dogs, but designed first and foremost as companion dogs.