Pet Heat Advisory

We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but being overeager in hot weather can spell danger, warn ASPCA experts. Heat Advisory

Even the healthiest pets can suffer from dehydration, heat stroke and sunburn if overexposed to the heat and heat stroke can be fatal if not treated promptly.

Take these simple precautions, provided by ASPCA experts, to help prevent your pet from overheating. And if you suspect your pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from your veterinarian immediately.

No Parking!
Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle. On a hot day, a parked car can become a furnace in no time—even with the windows open—which could lead to fatal heat stroke. Also, leaving pets unattended in cars in extreme weather is illegal in several states.

Know the Warning Signs
Symptoms of overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. They can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.

Made in the Shade
Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it’s hot outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot.

Summer Style
Giving your dog a lightweight summer haircut helps prevent overheating. Shave down to a one-inch length, never to the skin, so your dog still has some protection from the sun. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. As far as skin care, be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.

Street Smarts
When the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. Keep walks during these times to a minimum.

Make a Safe Splash
Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool—not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur, and try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains chlorine and other chemicals that could cause stomach upset.

Screen Test
During warmer months, the ASPCA sees an increase in injured animals as a result of High-Rise Syndrome, which occurs when pets—mostly cats—fall out of windows or doors and are seriously or fatally injured. Pet owners need to know that this is completely preventable if they take simple precautions. Keep all un-screened windows or doors in your home closed and make sure adjustable screens are tightly secured.

If you suspect that your pet is experiencing any symptoms of illness or injury please contact you vet immediately!

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com.

 

Advertisements

Dog Profile Of The Week – Havanese

Havanese are small dogs weighing seven to 13 pounds. The height ranges from 8 1/2 to 11 1/2 inches at the shoulder. The body is longer than tall; Havanesethey have drop ears and a tail that curls over the back. Havanese generally mature at 1 year of age, although they reach their full size around 6 to 8 months.

The Havanese coat is straight or wavy. This dog was often called the “Havana silk dog” because the coat, while double-coated, feels like fine silk. The adult coat reaches a length of six to eight inches. Unlike the bichon, the Havanese comes in many colors including gold, black, blue, silver, cream, champagne, chocolate and any combination of the acceptable colors including tricolor and parti-color.

Personality:

Havanese are affectionate and happy dogs. They do not make good kennel dogs and prefer being with their owners. They are active dogs and enjoy learning tricks and playing games with their owners.

Havanese are intelligent and trainable. They need socialization to prevent them from becoming timid with strangers.

Living With:

Havanese need a large amount of interaction with people. They are generally good with other pets if properly socialized, and they enjoy outside activities.

The Havanese can be a good watchdog but poor guard dog because of the small size. Occasionally, one may bark excessively if not properly trained.

Havanese require brushing and combing three or more times a week to ensure a mat-free coat. They do not require trimming.

The Havanese breed is ideal for a person who wants a small, active dog who does not require a large yard and can be contented with frequent walks and games of fetch. These dogs do not do well left alone for long periods.

Havanese typically live from 10 to 15 years.

History:

The Havanese is an old breed from the bichon family. Originally, Tenerife dogs came to Cuba with Spanish farmers and noblemen in the early 1500s. These dogs developed into the Havanese with little, if any, outside influences.

In Havana, the breed became a family pet. By the 18th century, Europeans vacationing in Havana discovered the Havanese. The little dog quickly became a hit among Spanish, French and British nobility.

With Castro’s revolution, some Cubans who fled to the United States brought their Havanese with them. These 11 dogs became the foundation stock for the Havanese of today. The Havanese is the most recent admission to the American Kennel Club’s Toy Group.

Dog Profile Of The Week – Border Collie

Border collies are medium-sized dogs.

Males stand as tall as 22 inches and weigh up to about 45 pounds (20 kilograms). Females stand as tall as 21 inches and weigh up to about 42 pounds (19 kilograms).Border Collie

They look like a lighter-weight Australian shepherd, but instead of the bobtail characteristic of the Aussie, border collies have a feathered tail that reaches to the hocks. The head is like that of a collie, and the body is slightly longer than the dog is tall. The ears stand but the tips drop over, giving them a jaunty appearance.

Some border collies have a coarse coat about three inches long, while others have a sleek coat about one inch long. A variety of colors are seen including black and white, red and white, black and gray, all black and tri-color. The longer-haired border collie usually has a lush mane and tail.

Personality:

Border collies are active, working dogs best suited to country living. If confined without activity and company, these dogs can become unhappy and destructive. The breed is highly intelligent, learns quickly and responds well to praise.

Because of their herding instincts, they are protective of their family and territory and make excellent watchdogs. They will look out for the family kids. Although they get along well with children and other pets they are raised with, they can be reserved and sometimes snappish with strangers, nipping at the heels the same way they would nip at sheep if herding.

Living With:

Border collies are extremely energetic dogs and must have the opportunity to get lots of exercise. They love to run. They also need ample attention from their owners and a job to do, whether that be herding livestock or fetching a ball.

They should be socialized well from the time they are young to prevent shyness around strangers, and they should have obedience training, which can help deter nipping behavior and a tendency to run off or chase cars.

Border collies are considered average shedders. Brushing at least weekly is needed to keep the coat nice. This breed lives about 12 to 15 years.

History:

Border collies are herders and were bred to work sheep, but they can manage just about any type of herd and will even herd children in the family.

The breed originated in the lowland and border counties of England and Scotland and may date back to the 1700s. The ancestors of the border collie are thought to be other types of collies, such as the bearded collie and Scotch collie, and some breed historians believe spaniel might be in the mix somewhere.

During the 19th century, border collies became popular among English gentry. Today, they are still used for working livestock and are family pets. Because they train easily, border collies are also used for police work, narcotics and bomb detection and for search and rescue missions. They also make good guide dogs for the blind. Borders have recently entered AKC show rings amid controversy and protests from fanciers who worry breeding for appearance may compromise working ability.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

Local Pet Event Alert – Strut Your Mutt Bethesda

Fun Local Pet Event For The Entire Family!

Strut Your Mutt Bethesda 2013 will take place on May 18 between 10AM and 3PM in the Woodmont Triangle Area of Bethesda at Norfolk Ave. and Woodmont Ave. The day Strut You Mutt Bethesdawill be packed with fun activities for kids, adults, and their best friend!

Parking is available in Public Parking Garage #11, at Woodmont Avenue and Norfolk Ave.

2013 FESTIVAL TIMELINE:

10:00am – 3:00pm Registration, Dog Vendors, Music
10:00am – 3:00pm Kids Play Area – Moonbounces and Games
10:00am – 2:00pm Raffle – win 50% of the pot – you need not be present to win!
10:30am Parade Line-up – at Main Stage
10:45am Dog Parade
11:30am Dog Contests – Main Stage
Noon – 3pm Every half hour: Training shows  and Adoption Shows by rescue groups.
2:15pm Raffle Winners Announced
3:00pm Strut Your Mutt Concludes

Parade Awards – one winner in each category

  • Best Strut – large dog
  • Best Strut – small dog
  • Biggest dog
  • Smallest dog
  • Best tail wag
  • Best Parade Outfits
  • Best Mutt

Contests – 1st, 2nd and 3rd places:

  • Owner/Dog look-alike
  • Best Kisser
  • Best Costume
  • Best Trick
  • Best Singer

Strut Your Mutt is a rain or shine event.

CAVALCADE OF EXHIBITORS 
You’ll find everything from dog accessory retailers, to vets, to dog photographers, to dog walkers, to dog trainers, to doggy daycare providers.
DOG PARADE
Hundreds of dog owners will Strut with their Mutts in our parade through downtown Bethesda. Judges along the parade route will judge the dogs on “Best Mutt Strut,” “Best Parade Outfit,” and other categories.
DOG AND OWNER CONTESTS
Do you look like your dog? Is your dog the best dressed in Bethesda? How about the best kisser? Does your dog know an amazing trick?
DOG ADOPTION SHOW
See dogs available for adoption from the Montgomery County Humane Society and local rescue organizations strut their stuff across the main stage. Maybe you’ll meet your new best friend!
CENTRAL BARK – KIDS PLAY AREA
Fun for kids of all ages including a moonbounce, games, and facepainting.Plus, food (for people and dogs) and music. A great day of fun for you, your family and your dog.

Happy Mother’s Day

Before I was a dog mom

Greenbriar Veterinary Hospital & Luxury Pet Resort

“Before I Was a Dog Mom”

Before I was a Dog Mom:
I made and ate hot meals unmolested.
I had unstained, unfurred clothes.
I had quiet conversations on the phone,
even if the doorbell rang.

Before I was a Dog Mom:
I slept as late as I wanted
and never worried about how late I got to bed
or if I could get into my bed.

Before I was a Dog Mom:
I cleaned my house every day.
I never tripped over toys, stuffies, chewies
or invited the neighbor’s dog over to play.

Before I was a Dog Mom:
I didn’t worry if my plants, cleansers,
plastic bags, toilet paper, soap or deodorant
were poisonous or dangerous.

Before I was a Dog Mom:
I had never been peed on,
pooped on, drooled on,
chewed on or pinched by puppy teeth.

Before I was a Dog Mom:
I had complete…

View original post 160 more words

Dog Profile Of The Week – Keeshond

The Keeshond (pronounced KAYZ-hawnd) is a double-coated breed. This coat consists of a woolly undercoat and a longer guard coat. The undercoat is a pale gray or cream color and the outer guard hairs are a mixture of gray and black with black tips. Twice a year, Keeshonden “blow,”Keeshond or shed their undercoats completely. This intense shedding period can last up to three weeks. Keeshonden appear larger than they really are because of their full, thick coat.

The average height of a mature Keeshond (over 2 years old) is 17″ for females and 18″ for males. The weight is ideally between 36 and 40 pounds. Except during the time of shedding, the keeshond coat is fairly easy to care for. Daily brushing is ideal, but once or twice per week will help to keep the coat clean and remove any loose undercoat.

In addition to their beautiful coats, Keeshonden are recognized for their alert, smiling expression and the distinctive “spectacles,” which are lightly shaded lines slanting upward from the outer portion of the eye to the lower corner of the ears.

Personality:

The natural tendencies of the Keeshond are such that no special training is usually needed for them to act as an alert watchdog. They rarely bite, however, and once a person is welcomed into the home, the keeshond will readily accept them.

The keeshond is friendly by nature to both people and other dogs. Their demand for affection is high, and they prefer to be included with the family rather than be left outside on their own. Keeshonden both bark and “talk.” The alert keeshond barks a warning that a stranger is near, but rarely are they nuisance barkers.

Living With:

Keeshonden are handsome, intelligent dogs with a delightful personality. Their playful, affectionate nature makes them ideal family pets. Unlike other northern breeds, the Keeshonden are relatively easy to train.

Rarely are they nuisance barkers, but they will bark a warning that a stranger is near. A keeshond is most happy if allowed to live in the home with the family, his “pack.” The ideal situation, of course, is one in which the dog can come in and out of the house on its own, through a dog door.

Keeshonden can remain outside in cold weather, but appropriate shelter should be provided. Because of their thick coats a hot, humid climate is not recommended.

History:

The keeshond (pronounced KAYZ-hawnd) is an old breed used for centuries as a family companion and watchdog. Many Keeshonden could be found living on the barges and farms in Holland where their masters depended on them for controlling the vermin population as well as providing loyal companionship.

A longtime resident of Holland, the Keeshond became the symbol of the Patriot Party in the 18th century. The name comes from the leader of this group, Kees De Gyselaer. This is the basis for the breed name as “Kees’ dog” in Dutch would be “Kees hund.”

The original Keeshond probably descended from the same arctic strains that produced the samoyed, spitz and Norwegian elkhound. The dog’s gentleness and devotion suggest that he was never intended as a hunting dog, but rather as a companion.

Today, the Keeshond continues to be regarded as a loyal house pet and an outgoing “people dog.”

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

 

Great Pet Product Savings In The Month Of May

 

COUPON ALERT – Wellness Checkup Discount Offer From Merial (March 1, 2013 – June 30, 2013)

Choose your savings:

– $25.00 Off Wellness Check Up When You Purchase 6 Doses Of FRONTLINE PLUS And 12 Doses Of HEARTGARD or
– $15.00 Off Wellness Check Up When You Purchase 6 Doses Of FRONTLINE PLUS.
*Note – Coupon will be applied at time of purchase.

Frontline & Heartgard Offers:

 

* Buy 3 Frontline treatments and receive 1 FREE

 

* Buy 6 Frontline treatment and receive 2 FREE

 

* $12.00 Rebate from Merial When you purchase 12 pack of Heartgard

 

 

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com