Dog Profile Of The Week – Pug

Pugs are members of the toy group despite their solid appearance.

They range in height from 10 to 11 inches and in weight from 14 to 18 pounds (six to eight kilograms). They are square dogs with Pugsubstantial limbs. Pugs are the sturdiest dogs of the toy group, befitting their mastiff heritage.

Pugs are known for their large, round heads, with the shortened muzzles and extensive forehead wrinkles. The vertical wrinkle on the forehead is said to resemble the Chinese character for “prince” and thus known as the “prince mark.” The eyes protrude somewhat, making them prone to trauma. The tail curls tightly over the hip.

They have a short, but very dense double coat. Colors can range from apricot to fawn, silver and black. All but the black dogs have a dark mask and ears with a trace of darkening down the back. The ears feel like black velvet.

Personality:

Pugs are not the lively socialites that some of the toy breeds are. They are a bit more serious, with a dry sense of humor. The breed motto is “multum in parvo,” meaning a lot in a little, with plenty of dog in a small package. Pugs can be stubborn but normally want to please.

These are fairly laid-back dogs, not usually given to extensive barking, digging or chewing. Pugs tend to get along well with other dogs and are sturdy enough to get along with children. They enjoy company and can be quite affectionate. True to their grouping, they are good companion dogs.

Living With:

Pugs are extremely easy to keep and have a serious tendency to become obese unless their diet and exercise are watched carefully. With the short muzzle, they do not do well in hot, humid weather and must be observed carefully for heatstroke. Pugs do tend to snore, again a result of the short muzzle. The prominent eyes are easily injured and care must be taken to keep them moist. Pugs are fairly robust and often live to 14 or 15 years of age.

Pugs do best with some daily exercise to help with their weight problems. Despite their heroic alarm years ago, they are not usually great watchdogs, preferring instead to greet newcomers with a wagging tail. Pugs should be socialized to keep that outgoing temperament, and they do well with other pets.

Grooming is important, both for the shedding from the dense coat and to keep facial wrinkles clean. A quick daily grooming, even a swipe with a hound mitt, usually suffices for the coat and a gentle wiping with a wet cloth for the face.

History:

While the pug is often associated with Holland, the breed originated in China, probably bred down from one of the local mastiff-type dogs. The little dogs with the round heads and expressive facial wrinkles were then transported to Holland via trading ships of the Dutch East India Company. In 1572, a pug sounded the alarm that saved Prince William from the approaching Spanish soldiers, and the breed forever after was tied to the royal House of Orange.

Napoleon’s wife had a pet pug, and the duke and duchess of Windsor had a pug as a royal companion. Victorian England took on pugs as the latest rage in canine fashion and many pugs can be spotted in paintings of that era.

The word “pug” may come from the Latin “pugnus” for fist, possibly describing the round face and head. The name does not fit the breed’s temperament, because these are not really guard dogs, but designed first and foremost as companion dogs.

Dr. Bev Hollis, DVM Joins Greenbriar Veterinary Hospital & Luxury Pet Resort

Please welcome Dr. Bev Hollis, DVM to our sister facility Greenbriar Veterinary Hospital & Luxury Pet Resort.

Greenbriar Veterinary Hospital & Luxury Pet Resort

Please join us in welcoming Dr. Bev Hollis, DVM to our veterinary practice here at Greenbriar Veterinary Hospital & Luxury Pet Resort.  Her knowledge and years of experience will be a wonderful addition to our thriving Veterinary Hospital.

Bev Hollis, DVM

Dr. Bev Hollis

 Dr. Hollis moved to the northern Virginia/ Maryland region in 2006 from Nashville, where she had lived for 13 years.  She earned her undergraduate degrees in English, Math and Biology from the University of Minnesota and George Mason University and graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine in 1997.

During her years in Nashville she worked in a small animal practice, started her own veterinary house call practice, and became Nashville’s first full-time shelter veterinarian. She is an avid supporter of greyhound rescue and was a co-founder of Operation Scooby, a non-profit organization that sent teams to Spain annually to work as volunteers…

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Summer Home & Yard Safety For Your Pet!

Your home is where your heart is. Home is the place where your family can come and feel safe, protected and loved. But are you sure your home Dog Safetyis safe for your pets? What you can do to make sure your pets stay free from harm?

Fix Your Fences
Your dog is in the most danger when he’s not in your backyard, so make sure he stays put by checking to see if your yard is securely fenced in. Make sure he can’t jump over or squeeze through any part and that all your gates are closed.

Prepare Your Pool
Many dogs are attracted to swimming pools. To make sure your dog doesn’t go for an unexpected dip, surround your pool with pet fencing. If that’s not an option make sure your dog has the ability to get out of the pool if he happens to go in. Also, remember to store all pool chemicals safely out of his reach and that your electrical leads can’t be found by a chewing puppy.

Beat the Heat
Help prevent your pet from getting dehydrated and being susceptible to heat exhaustion in the warmer months by making sure he always has plenty of fresh drinking water. Also, see that he has a cool, shaded area to rest in. Patios and driveways can become scorching during the hottest time of the day and could burn your pet. A good rule of thumb is if it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for him.

Curb Your Chemicals
Your dog probably enjoys all the interesting bugs in your backyard, but if you feel the need to spray for them, make sure you keep him out of the yard for at least 24 hours. Check the plants in your yard as well. Some popular plants, like the yew, azalea, and oleander can be fatal if ingested by your dog. Also, if you have a four-legged friend who likes to eat random things, try to stay away from compost, peat and red mulch. Each can be toxic if eaten in large amounts.

It may seem like making your yard safe for your dog is just as hard as making your yard safe for a child … but in a lot of ways, it’s the same thing. Your dog is a family member you love and don’t want to see hurt, so take the time to make your yard safe for everyone!

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

 

Dog Profile Of The Week – Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Males range from 23 to 26 inches in height and about 65 to 80 pounds (29 to 36 kilograms); females range Chesapeake Bay Retrieverfrom 21 to 24 inches and weigh from about 55 to 70 pounds (25 to 32 kilograms).

Chesapeake Bay retrievers are gracefully proportioned. The head is round and broad. The jaws are long enough to grasp game birds, and short enough to ensure a strong grip. The hanging ears are smallish and set well up on the head. The body and tail are medium in length. The chest is deep and wide. A distinctive feature is that the hindquarters are at least as high, and often higher, than the shoulders.

The breed is known for its water-resistant, double coat. The outer coat is short and wavy; the undercoat is fine and wooly and contains natural oils that help protect the dog during the long cold swims required for duck retrieving. The coat ranges in camouflage colors from dark brown to tan or the color of dead grass. Some Chessies have white spots. The Chesapeake Bay retriever also has a characteristic yellowish or amber eye color.

Personality:

Chesapeake Bay retrievers are not as gregarious as most other retriever breeds. Nonetheless, they generally like children and most are friendly to strangers. They also tend to get along with other animals, although some Chessies have demonstrated aggression toward other dogs.

The breed does not bark excessively, nor are Chessies considered particularly excitable. In fact, the breed is considered to be even-tempered.

Some breed experts report that Chesapeake Bay retrievers are easy to train and housebreak. Others say that some of these dogs can be strong-willed, that obedience training is strongly recommended, and that the Chessie may not be the best breed for novice dog guardians.

Living With:

Chesapeake Bay retrievers are sporting dogs and require a considerable amount of exercise. Consequently, they do very well living in areas where they can romp, swim and hunt. However, they can adapt to urban life if the guardian is willing to provide long walks. Occasional trips to places where the dog can swim and fetch toys or sticks is ideal, since these dogs are avid water lovers and retrievers.

Chesapeake Bay retrievers are protective of their guardians and are considered moderately good watch dogs. They require minimal coat care, but grooming with a rubber brush occasionally is advised to help keep the coat in good condition and to control oil in the coat. Chessies shed, but less than many other large dogs.

History:

The Chesapeake Bay retriever history began in 1807 when two Newfoundland puppies were rescued from a distressed British ship off the coast of Maryland. The dogs proved to be excellent duck retrievers and were crossed with other dogs, possibly flat-coated and curly-coated retrievers. The offspring also were excellent retrievers. By the mid-1880s, the breed was reportedly used to retrieve up to 300 ducks daily and became known as the Chesapeake Bay retriever. Enthusiasts of the breed informally refer to this breed as “Chessies.”

The breed received AKC recognition in 1885. Although the Chesapeake Bay retriever is a sporting dog, the breed also has been used as a guide dog for the blind and is considered to be an excellent companion.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. www,fallsroadvet.com.

Dog Profile Of The Week – Jack Russell Terrier

The Jack Russell Terrier comes in three different coat types: smooth, broken and rough (coarse, longer Jack Russell Terrierstraight hair). All the coats tend to shed. Jack Russells are white with black or tan markings.

The breed has a compact, muscular body. The Jack Russell Terrier Club of America standard calls for dogs to be from 10 to 15 inches in height, whereas the AKC standard calls for a smaller range of 12 to 14 inches. JRTCA show dogs are classified into one of two groups based on size, 10 to 12 1/2 inches and over 12 1/2 to 15 inches.

Personality:

The Jack Russell terrier is a happy, energetic dog with a strong desire to work. This breed is most happy when given companionship and a job to do. Digging is normal for a Jack Russell, especially if he decides it is his job to free your yard from rodents! Hunting ability is bred into them; it is their nature. The desire to hunt combined with a high energy level makes training a must for the Jack Russell. You will never win a battle of wills with a Jack Russell.

Because he is a baying terrier, the Jack Russell can be vocal. However, these dogs are alert and make good watchdogs. The breed is naturally assertive and may not tolerate young children or other animals in the home. They especially can be aggressive toward other dogs.

Living With:

Given the personality of the Jack Russell, this breed is not for everyone. The hunting instinct cannot be trained out of the breed. These dogs instinctively see the family cat or hamster as prey. Some may be able to learn to get along with other pets if brought into the home as a puppy, but a potential guardian needs to consider the possibilities beforehand.

The Jack Russell terrier needs lots of exercise and a home with a large fenced yard is best. The Jack Russell has an urge to explore and hunt and will wander off; many have been trapped for days in underground culverts and dens. If kept indoors, daily brisk walks are a must!

The Jack Russell also enjoys going along on a hike or a long game of fetch. This is not the breed for you if you prefer a dog who will sit peacefully on the couch all day.

History:

The Jack Russell terrier is a true working terrier. The breed takes its name from the Reverend John Russell, who bred one of the finest strains of terriers for working fox in England. The Jack Russell is a baying terrier, meaning the dog should flush out the fox with his steady barking but is never to kill his prey. The Jack Russell has been strictly bred for hunting since its beginning in the early 1800s.

Because of their broad genetic make-up, there is some variance in the standard of Jack Russell terriers. In fact, disagreement about leg length has caused the breed to be divided into separate breeds in England, where the longer legged dogs are called Parson Jack Russell terriers and the shorter legged dogs are called simply Jack Russell terriers.

In America, despite the greater popularity of the short-legged dogs, the long-legged dogs are the breed officially recognized as the Jack Russell terrier. The breed has been poplar with the horse crowd for years.

Media exposure, especially the popularity of “Moose,” the terrier who plays “Eddie” on the television show “Frasier,” and “Soccer,” who stars in the children’s show “Wishbone,” have catapulted the breed to popularity.

The Jack Russell terrier is the newest member of the AKC terrier group, but that membership came amid protests from fanciers who feared AKC recognition was not good for the breed. The result is that two national associations exist for the breed, the original Jack Russell Terrier Club of America, and the newer AKC recognized Jack Russell Terrier Association of America.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions and concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

Acetaminophen Toxicity In Pets:

  • Acetaminophen can be toxic to dogs and cats, but cats are 7 to 10 times more susceptible to acetaminophen toxicity Dogs & Human Medicationthan dogs are.
  • Once swallowed, acetaminophen reaches the blood stream within 30 minutes; toxic effects are rapid and damage the liver and red blood cells.
  • Never give a medication intended for people to your pet unless instructed to do so by your veterinarian.

What Is Acetaminophen Toxicity?

Acetaminophen is the active ingredient in Tylenol and some other related medications that are used to treat pain and fever in people. Unfortunately, this drug can be extremely toxic (poisonous) to cats and dogs. Acetaminophen toxicity occurs when a cat or dog swallows enough of the drug to cause damaging effects in the body.

Acetaminophen is mostly metabolized (broken down and eliminated from the body) by the liver. Some of the substances that are created during this process can have harmful effects on cats and dogs. Cats are at much greater risk of toxicity than dogs because they lack certain proteins necessary for the liver to safely metabolize acetaminophen.

How Does Acetaminophen Toxicity Occur?

Many cases of acetaminophen toxicity in dogs and cats are accidental. A pet may find and chew on a bottle of pills or eat a pill that has fallen on the floor. Sadly, some cases occur because pet owners give medication intended for people to their pets without being instructed to do so by a veterinarian.

Acetaminophen is a drug meant for people. However, there are situations in which your veterinarian may prescribe a specific dosage of acetaminophen for your dog. Be sure to follow your veterinarian’s dosage directions very carefully and report any vomiting or other problems right away. Cats are 7 to 10 times more susceptible to acetaminophen toxicity than dogs are. Because cats are extremely sensitive to the drug’s toxic effects, acetaminophen is not given to cats.

What Are the Clinical Signs of Acetaminophen Toxicity?

Once swallowed, acetaminophen is rapidly absorbed from the stomach and intestines and can achieve significant levels in the blood within 30 minutes. The main toxic effects take two forms:

  • Liver damage: One of the substances produced by the breakdown of acetaminophen binds to liver cells, damaging them. Severe damage can lead to liver failure.
  • Damage to red blood cells: One of the substances produced by the breakdown of acetaminophen binds to red blood cells. Once bound, this substance changes hemoglobin (the protein in red blood cells that enables them to carry oxygen) into a molecule that is no longer able to carry oxygen. This means that the blood can no longer supply adequate amounts of oxygen to the body’s vital organs. The altered hemoglobin molecule is called methemoglobin; its lack of oxygen-carrying ability changes the color of blood from red to brown.

Cats and dogs can develop both forms of acetaminophen toxicity. However, cats are more likely to suffer hemoglobin damage while dogs are more likely to suffer liver damage. The main clinical signs associated with acetaminophen toxicity that result from liver injury and an inability of the blood to carry oxygen include:

  • Vomiting
  • Decreased appetite
  • Lethargy (tiredness)
  • Difficult or rapid breathing
  • Abdominal pain
  • Brown discoloration of the gums (a result of methemoglobin)
  • Brown urine
  • Blue gums (known as cyanosis, indicates inadequate oxygen supply)
  • Swelling of the face or paws
  • Shock, collapse, death

How Is Acetaminophen Toxicity Diagnosed?

Diagnosis of acetaminophen toxicity is commonly based on a history of recently chewing or swallowing pills. Your veterinarian may recommend diagnostic testing, such as a chemistry panel and complete blood cell count (CBC), to assess the extent of the damage.

What Are the Treatment and Outcome for Pets Suffering From Acetaminophen Toxicity?

Acetaminophen is absorbed and metabolized very quickly. If you realize right away that your pet has swallowed acetaminophen, vomiting can be induced to remove the drug from your pet’s stomach before the body can absorb it. Your veterinarian may also administer a special preparation of liquid-activated charcoal to slow absorption of toxic material from the stomach and intestines.

There is a specific antidote for acetaminophen toxicity. This medication, N-acetylcysteine, limits formation of the toxic substance that damages the liver and red blood cells.  Additional treatments may include blood transfusions, intravenous fluid therapy, and other medications to help support and stabilize the patient.

Acetaminophen toxicity can be fatal. However, pets can survive if the condition is recognized, diagnosed, and treated quickly.

Most cases of acetaminophen toxicity are preventable. Never give medications meant for people to your pet unless instructed to do so by your veterinarian, and keep all medications in the home secured to help prevent accidental swallowing.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concern. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

Dog Profile Of The Week – Great Dane

Great Danes are huge, powerful and elegant dogs. Males can reach 32 inches tall and weigh anywhere from Great Daneabout 100 to 120 pounds, while females may be 30 inches tall and weigh about 100 to 120 pounds (45 to 59 kilograms).

The Great Dane’s massive head is narrow and flat on top. The eyebrows are prominent. The ears drop forward or are cropped to stand erect. The neck is long and strong. The Great Dane’s body is long, muscular and the front legs are straight. The tail is medium in length; it is thick at the base and tapers down to below the hocks.

Great Danes are light to average shedders. The coat is short and sleek and comes in a variety of colors including brindle or fawn, blue, black or harlequin, which has black patches over a white background.

The breed has poor longevity; Great Danes live only 6-8 years or less.

Personality:

Great Danes are considered gentle giants. They are moderately playful, affectionate and good with children. They will guard their home. Great Danes generally get along with other animals, particularly if raised with them, but some individuals in the breed can be aggressive with dogs they do not know.

Great Danes are considered easy to train, but some Great Dane fanciers say that individuals can be stubborn learners.

Living With:

Anyone who wants a Great Dane must be willing to accommodate this dog’s great size. A Great Dane will eat far larger quantities of food than a small dog, so feeding is going to cost a lot more for a Great Dane than, say, for a tiny Chihuahua.

A Great Dane must have room to move around and exercise, especially when he is young. Anyone wanting to keep a Great Dane in the city must be prepared to take the dog out for long, daily walks.

Great Danes must be obedience trained to assure they are manageable when fully grown.

A condition known as bloat, which involves gas buildup and possible twisting of the stomach, is a real possibility with a giant-breed dog such as the Great Dane. To prevent this potentially life-threatening problem, feed two or three small meals daily instead of one large one, and encourage the dog to rest for at least one hour after eating. Very large dogs also benefit from raised food bowls so they will not have to splay their legs to eat.

History:

The Great Dane, also known as the Apollo of dogs, is a giant breed. The Dane is German in origin, not Danish. The breed is thought to have been around for more than 400 years. Great Danes descend from mastiff-like dogs that were bred by German nobility to protect country estates and hunt wild boar.

In the 18th century, Great Danes were prestigious guardians of estates and carriages. They were also popular with the upper class for sport, as few other dogs could bring down a wild boar.

The Great Danes that were more like those we know today were developed in the 1800s. In 1880, the Germans banned the name “Great Dane” and called the breed “Deutsche Dogge,” which means German mastiff; however, the breed continues to be called Great Dane in English speaking countries.

These dogs are primarily family pets and, despite their size, have become popular among city dwellers who keep them to help guard against robbers.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com