Easter Pet Safety And Hidden Dangers To Pets

Easter Pet Safety & Hidden Dangers To Pets

As you and your family prepare for Easter festivities here are Easter Dogsome Easter Pet Safety tips.

1. Easter grass is a decorative must for Easter baskets but can signal danger for your pet if ingested. If eaten it can cause several health problems even death. Easter grass can wrap around your pets intestine and cut off circulation. It can also cause vomiting, choking, constipation, painful defecation and abdominal pain. Instead opt for a safer alternative, tissue paper or real grass.

2. No Chocolate! Dogs can’t resist something sweet to gobble on, including the infamous chocolate bunny. Chocolate contains a highly toxic ingredient known as theobromine, making even small amounts of chocolate extremely hazardous to your pets health. Theobromine, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, seizures and an abnormally elevated heart rate. Although your dog should avoid all types of chocolate, dark chocolate contains the highest concentrations of theobromine making it the most toxic. Early symptoms of chocolate toxicity are vomiting, diarrhea and trembling. If your dog exhibits these symptoms please seek vet help immediately.

3. Avoid Sugar Substitutes: Xylitol, an artificial sweetener used in many candies, chewing gums and baked goods, is potentially very toxic to dogs and cats. If ingested can cause a rapid drop in blood sugar and can lead to seizures & liver failure.

4. Poisonous Easter Bouquets & Plants. Lilies, amaryllis, and kalanchoe are just a few popular flowers used in Easter floral arrangements. While they make for beautiful centerpieces on your Easter table, certain plants and flowers can be deadly for pets. The Easter Lily is a plant commonly found in bouquets this time of year but highly toxic to cats if ingested. If eaten this flower can cause vomiting and lethargy, and if untreated, may progress to kidney (renal) failure and death. Please call your veterinarian immediately if you suspect that your cat has eaten any part of a lily plant. Other potentially poisonous flowers to avoid include tulips, calla lilies, daisies, chrysanthemums and baby’s breath.

5. Real or fake plastic eggs can be dangerous. Pets may confuse a shiny plastic eggs for their next chew toy or tasty treat. If they chew and swallow the plastic it can cause intestinal damage which may require surgery. While hard-boiled have a tendency to be misplaced or not found during those Easter egg hunts and can easily spoil. If the egg is discovered days later and eaten by your pet it can cause an upset stomach. Make sure you keep track of the number of eggs hidden and their whereabouts so you can easily inventory at the end of the hunt.

6. Cute Easter toys are not meant to be eaten: Festive bunnies and chick toys make cute Easter basket stuffers for the kids, but may be viewed as a mid afternoon snack for your pet. Small toys are a choking hazard and should be kept away from cats and dogs. Please be mindful of your pets this Easter. Happy Easter!

Please contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. www,fallsroadvet.com

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Dog Profile Of The Week – The Norwich Terrier

The Norwich terrier is one of the smallest of the working terriers, weighing 11 to 12 pounds.Norwich Terrier

The height is ideally 10 inches at the shoulder. The body is long and the head is fox-like. A Norwich generally matures at one year, with full size attained between 6 and 8 months.

The Norwich coat is short, harsh, wiry and straight. The breed has a definite undercoat. This dog sheds twice a year and requires brushing and combing twice a week. The color can be red, wheaten, black and tan, black and gray, or red and white mixed in a grizzled pattern.

Personality:

Norwich terriers are active, intelligent dogs. They do not make good kennel dogs; they prefer being with their guardians and characteristically are interested in everything their guardians do. Typical terriers, they are energetic and capable of much mischief, needing plenty of things to do or they will find something. They tend to be stubborn. They excel in earth dog and agility trials.

Having the terrier instinct to roam, these dogs are generally untrustworthy off leash. Their curiosity and hunting urge draws them to roam and explore every cranny. Like all terriers, they may chew and dig if bored.

Living With:

Norwich terriers need a large amount of interaction with people. They tolerate other dogs and cats well, if raised with them. The Norwich’s heritage of ridding vermin makes them apt to kill other small pets such as rodents, birds and reptiles, so these should be kept away from the Norwich.

Norwich terriers make excellent watchdogs but poor guard dogs because of their size. They can bark excessively if not properly trained. They also will pull on the leash. They enjoy outside activities.

The Norwich Terrier is ideal for a guardian who wants a small, active dog who does not require a large yard and can be contented with frequent walks, games of fetch, and other activities. They do not do well left alone for long periods.

Norwich terriers typically live from 13 to 15 years.

History:

The Norwich Terrier, close cousin to the Norfolk Terrier, originated in East Anglia, England. These dogs were sought as ratters and, by the 1880s, were popular at Cambridge University among the students. One dog named Rags who lived at a stable near Norwich became the founding sire for the Norwich Terrier. Through selective breeding, horsemen bred other terriers to Rags and his offspring to produce a ratter and a fox hunter.

The Norwich terrier was introduced into America in 1914. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed 1936. The Norwich and Norfolk terriers were considered as two varieties of the same breed until 1979, when the AKC recognized the Prick Ear Norwich to be a separate breed.

The Norwich terrier is the quintessential terrier. He is feisty and tough. He delights his guardian as a faithful companion as well as an accomplished ratter.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

Leptospirosis In Pets

  • Leptospirosis is a serious and potentially fatal bacterial disease that can be transmitted to humans.Dog In Water
  • The disease typically attacks the kidneys and liver of infected dogs.
  • It is transmitted to dogs through contact with contaminated water, soil, or surfaces. Localized outbreaks may occur in areas that have recently experienced flooding.
  • Infected dogs require treatment with antibiotics and fluid therapy.
  • The risk of infection can be reduced by attempting to avoid high-risk environments; vaccination of individual dogs may be recommended.

What Is Leptospirosis?

Leptospirosis is a potentially serious disease caused by the bacterium Leptospira interrogans. It affects dogs but can also infect a wide variety of domestic and wild animals and humans. The bacteria can survive for long periods of time in water and are frequently found in swamps, streams, lakes, and standing water. The bacteria also survive well in mud and moist soil, and localized outbreaks can occur after flooding. Infected animals can continue to shed the bacteria in their urine for months or even years after recovery. Carriers of the bacteria include raccoons, opossums, rodents, skunks, and dogs. The disease is transmitted to dogs when they have contact with urine or contaminated water or soil.

Signs of Leptospirosis

Clinical signs typically develop 2 to 12 days after exposure to the bacterium. In many dogs, infection may remain subclinical (without clinical signs) or chronic. In acute, or more serious cases, dogs may experience potentially fatal kidney or liver disease.

Signs include:

  • Weight loss
  • Fever
  • Inappetence (appetite loss)
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • Muscle and/or joint pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Bloody urine
  • Excessive thirst
  • Jaundice
  • Excessive bleeding

Diagnosis and Treatment

Leptospirosis can be diagnosed through blood tests; however, tests may need to be performed multiple times to confirm a diagnosis.

Treatment typically consists of a regimen of antibiotics. Complications such as liver or kidney damage or spontaneous bleeding are treated with fluid therapy and other treatments that are appropriate for the individual patient. Hospitalization is required in many cases.

Prevention

Exposure to leptospirosis can be reduced by preventing your dog from drinking from puddles of standing water or from swimming in lakes, streams, or other bodies of water that may be contaminated. Unfortunately, for dogs that are accustomed to an active outdoor lifestyle that includes swimming, these precautions may not be practical.

Prevention of leptospirosis is complicated by the fact that there are more than 200 different serovars (subtypes) of the Leptospira interrogans bacterium that can cause illness in animals and people. The available vaccines only protect against a handful of the most common subtypes that infect dogs, which can limit the protective value of the vaccines. Nevertheless, the available vaccines are effective and safe when used as directed, and many veterinarians recommend the vaccination for dogs at risk for exposure. Annual revaccination is required.

The leptospirosis vaccine is not required for all dogs. Your veterinarian may recommend this vaccine based on your dog’s lifestyle and exposure risk.

Vaccination, no matter how routine, is a medical procedure. Always monitor your pet for signs of a vaccine reaction and follow your veterinarian’s instructions on what to do if one occurs.

Caution: Humans can also become infected with leptospirosis, so handle dogs suspected of having the disease with care. Adhere to good hygiene techniques, such as frequent hand washing and avoiding contact with potentially contaminated urine.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

Dog Breed Profile Of The Week – Dachshund

All three varieties of dachshunds — the smooth-, wire- and long-coated — are found in two sizes called standard and miniature.

Miniatures are not a separate AKC classification but compete in a class division for “11 pounds and under at 12 months of ageDachshund and older.” Weight of the standard size is usually between 16 and 32 pounds. There is no height standard for the dachshund but they are usually under nine inches in height.

All three types are known for their long backs and short muscular legs, which explains the unflattering nicknames “sausage hound” or “hot dog.” They also have a long muzzle, long and droopy ears, and a tail carried in line with the back.

The dachshund’s coat may be shades of red, black, chocolate, white or gray. Some have tan markings or are spotted or dappled. Dachshunds live about 12 to 15 years.

Personality:

Despite their size, dachshunds are known for their courageous nature and will take on animals much larger than themselves. Some may be aggressive toward strangers and other dogs.

As family dogs, dachshunds are loyal companions and good watchdogs. They are good with children if treated well. They can be slightly difficult to train.

Some dachshund fanciers say there are personality differences among the different varieties of the breed. For instance, the long-coat dachshund is reportedly calmer than the smooth-coat variety, and the wire-coat dachshund is more outgoing and clown-like.

Dachshunds were bred as hunters so it is no surprise that many of them like to dig. Some are also barkers, and, in one survey, dachshunds ranked high for destructiveness.

Living With:

Dachshunds are prone to disk problems because they have a long back, so this dog is not a good choice for anyone with a lot of steps in their home. To further protect the dachshund’s back, the dog should not be allowed to jump on and off furniture, and his weight should be kept in check.

The smooth-coat dachshund requires little coat care other than an occasional rubdown or brushing. For the long-coat variety, daily brushing and combing is advised; the wire-coat dachshund requires stripping at least twice a year. The breed is considered an average shedder.

History:

The dachshund was bred in Germany hundreds of years ago to hunt badgers. “Dach” means badger and “hund” means dog. The three varieties of dachshund, smooth-, wire-,and long-coated, originated at different times. The smooth was the first and arose from a mixture of a miniature French pointer and a pinscher. The breed also comes in two sizes: standard and miniature, with the standard the original size.

The dachshund has short, strong legs that enable the dog to dig out prey and go inside burrows. Larger versions of the breed were used to chase deer or fox. Smaller dachshunds were bred for hunting hares and ferrets.

The breed is still used for hunting, primarily in Europe, but in North America this dog is usually a family pet. In fact, it is one of the most popular AKC breeds.

Please feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. fallsroadvethosp@aol.com

Interesting Dog Facts

Interesting Dog Facts:

  • A dog’s heart beats between 70 and 120 times a minute, compared with a human heart which beats 70 to 80 times a minute.
  • A dog’s normal body temperature is 100.5 to 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • A female carries her young about 60 days before the puppies are born.
  • According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the smallest dog on record was a Yorkshire Terrier in Great Britain who, at the age of 2, weighed just 4 ounces.
  • The longest lived dog, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, was an Australian Cattle Dog, named Bluey, who lived to be 29.
  • An adult dog has 42 teeth.
  • It is a myth that dogs are color blind. They can actually see in color, just not as vividly as humans. It is similar to our vision at dusk.
  • If never spayed or neutered, a female dog, her mate, and their puppies could produce over 66,000 dogs in 6 years!
  • The only sweat glands a dog has are between the paw pads.
  • In 1957, Laika became the first living being in space via an earth satellite
  • The world’s smartest dogs are thought to be (1) the Border Collie, (2) the Poodle, and (3) the Golden Retriever.
  • Chocolate contains a substance known as theobromine (similar to caffeine) which can kill dogs or at the very least make them violently ill.
  • Dogs’ sense of hearing is more than ten times more acute than a human’s
  • More than 1 in 3 American families own a dog.
  • Dogs don’t like rain because the sound is amplified and hurts their very sensitive ears.
  • The ten most popular dogs (AKC) are in order:
    Labrador Retriever, Yorkshire Terrier, German Shepherd,
    Golden Retriever, Beagle, Boxer, Dachshund, Poodle,
    Shih Tzu, and Bulldog.
  • Dogs were the first animals domesticated by people.
  • A greyhound can run as fast as 45 miles an hour.
  • Spaying/neutering your dog before the age of 6 months can help prevent cancer in your dog.
  • Puppies acquire a full mouth of permanent teeth between four and seven months old.
  • Small dogs live the longest. Toy breeds live up to 16 years or more. Larger dogs average is 7 – 12 years. Veterinary medicine has extended this estimate by about three years. However, some breeds, such as Tibetan Terrier live as long as twenty years.
  • Eighty percent of dog owners buy their dog presents for holidays and birthdays. More than half of them sign letters and cards from themselves and their pets.
  • The dog name “Fido” is from Latin and means “fidelity.”
  • The U.S. has the highest dog population in the world.
  • Most pet owners (94 percent) say their pet makes them smile more than once a day.
  • Dogs are mentioned 14 times in the Bible.
  • It has been established that people who own pets live longer, have less stress, and have fewer heart attacks.
  • All dogs can be traced back 40 million years ago to a weasel-like animal called the Miacis which dwelled in trees and dens. The Miacis later evolved into the Tomarctus,a direct forbearer of the genus Canis, which includes the wolf and jackal as well as the dog.
  • Seventy percent of people sign their pet’s name on greeting cards and 58 percent include their pets infamily and holiday portraits, according to a survey done by the American Animal Hospital Association.
  • A dog’s whiskers are touch-sensitive hairs called vibrissae. They are found on the muzzle, above the eyes and below the jaws, and can actually sense tiny changes in airflow.
  • The origin of amputating a dog’s tail may go back to the Roman writer Lucius Columella’s (A.D. 4-70) assertion that tail docking prevented rabies.
  • Dogs can smell about 1,000 times better than humans. While humans have 5 million smell-detecting cells, dogs have more than 220 million. The part of the brain that interprets smell is also four times larger in dogs than in humans.

Feel free to contact us here at Falls Road Veterinary Hospital with any questions or concerns. (301) 983-8400. http://www.fallsroadvet.com

Dog Breed Profile Of The Week – Newfoundland

The Newfoundland is a large, heavy-coated dog.

The male is 28 inches tall and weighs from 130 to 150 pounds (59 to 68 kilograms). The female is slightly smaller at 26 inches tall and 100 to 120Newfoundland pounds (45 to 54 kilograms). The outer coat is coarse and flat and has an oily, water-resistant quality that is perfectly suited to the dog’s strong desire to be in the water. The undercoat is soft and dense and requires daily brushing; they shed excess hair year round. Newfoundland colors are black, black with white, and brown with white splashes on the chest and tail tip.

Newfoundlands have a broad, massive head with small ears that lie close to the head. Their feet are wide with webbing between the toes for swimming.

Personality:

Despite the size of the Newfoundland, this dog is rather docile and can happily adjust to living in the house. He does, however, need considerable yard space for exercise and ideally should have safe access to water. The breed is watchful and trustworthy, and tolerant of the behavior of children. It is said that author J.M. Barrie based the “Nana” in Peter Pan on his own Newfoundland.

Newfoundlands are protective, known to put themselves physically between their family and any stranger. They are not barkers but will show themselves to be watchful and willing to protect. An intelligent breed, the guardians of Newfoundlands often tell of their dogs alerting them to fire in the home as well as rescuing them from their own swimming pools.

Living With:

The Newfoundland has a sweet disposition and is at home on land or in the water. The dog is an ideal companion for one person or a family, but the size of the Newfoundland should be taken into consideration. The adult Newfoundland does not require a great deal of exercise but can easily become a couch potato. He should be allowed daily walks, a run in the yard or especially a swim to keep fit. Extra weight can shorten the already short life span of a Newfoundland, usually 8 to 10 years.

As with any large breed, a Newfoundland requires plenty of food during the first year of growth. They literally gain 100 pounds in the first year! After that, however, their metabolism slows down, and they do not require nearly so many daily calories. A lean Newfoundland is definitely healthier than one with extra weight.

Newfoundlands are friendly dogs who love to keep you company. However, they do shed and are prone to drool on occasion. Grooming is important for this breed, both for their comfort and health. The coat needs to be brushed regularly to remove dead hairs, and nails should be kept to a short length. Regular nail trims will help to keep the feet from splaying, since they do have to support a heavy load.

History:

Developed on the island of Newfoundland, this breed is a remarkable swimmer with a history of performing incredible water rescues. The specific ancestors of this breed remain unknown, although it may be related to the Pyrenean mountain dogs that accompanied fisherman in the area. In the 18th century, the Newfoundland was sent into Britain and France and quickly became popular with the English sailors as a ship dog.

The breed became so renowned for its ability to perform water rescue that two Newfoundland dogs were a required part of the “equipment” on lifeguard stations along the coast of England.

As a ship dog, the Newfoundland’s job was to swim ashore with the line from the ship, establishing a connection with the help on shore. The Newfoundland was such a powerful swimmer that he could also haul a small boat to land.

One Newfoundland ship dog is credited with diving off the deck of a boat in the dark and rescuing Napoleon Bonaparte after he had fallen into the water!

 

Interesting Cat Facts

Interesting Cat Facts

  1. On average, cats spend 2/3 of every day sleeping. That means a nine-year-old cat has been awake for only three years of its life.
  2. Unlike dogs, cats do not have a sweet tooth. Scientists believe this is due to a mutation in a key taste receptor.
  3. When a cat chases its prey, it keeps its head level. Dogs and humans bob their heads up and down.
  4. The technical term for a cat’s hairball is a “bezoar.”
  5. A group of cats is called a “clowder.”
  6. Female cats tend to be right pawed, while male cats are more often left pawed. Interestingly, while 90% of humans are right handed, the remaining 10% of lefties also tend to be male.
  7. cat climb down
    A cat cannot climb head first down a tree because its claws are curved the wrong way

    A cat can’t climb head first down a tree because every claw on a cat’s paw points the same way. To get down from a tree, a cat must back down.

  8. Cats make about 100 different sounds. Dogs make only about 10.
  9. A cat’s brain is biologically more similar to a human brain than it is to a dog’s. Both humans and cats have identical regions in their brains that are responsible for emotions.
  10. There are more than 500 million domestic cats in the world, with approximately 40 recognized breeds.
  11. While it is commonly thought that the ancient Egyptians were the first to domesticate cats, the oldest known pet cat was recently found in a 9,500-year-old grave on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus. This grave predates early Egyptian art depicting cats by 4,000 years or more.
  12. During the time of the Spanish Inquisition, Pope Innocent VIII condemned cats as evil and thousands of cats were burned. Unfortunately, the widespread killing of cats led to an explosion of the rat population, which exacerbated the effects of the Black Death.
  13. During the Middle Ages, cats were associated with withcraft, and on St. John’s Day, people all over Europe would stuff them into sacks and toss the cats into bonfires. On holy days, people celebrated by tossing cats from church towers.
  14. cat pet
    Cats are the most popular pet in North American

    Cats are North America’s most popular pets: there are 73 million cats compared to 63 million dogs. Over 30% of households in North America own a cat.

  15. The group of words associated with cat (catt, cath, chat, katze) stem from the Latin catus, meaning domestic cat, as opposed to feles, or wild cat.
  16. The term “puss” is the root of the principal word for “cat” in the Romanian term pisica and the root of secondary words in Lithuanian (puz) and Low German puus. Some scholars suggest that “puss” could be imitative of the hissing sound used to get a cat’s attention.
  17. Approximately 40,000 people are bitten by cats in the U.S. annually.
  18. According to Hebrew legend, Noah prayed to God for help protecting all the food he stored on the ark from being eaten by rats. In reply, God made the lion sneeze, and out popped a cat.
  19. A cat’s hearing is better than a dog’s. And a cat can hear high-frequency sounds up to two octaves higher than a human.
  20. A cat can travel at a top speed of approximately 31 mph (49 km) over a short distance.
  21. A cat can jump up to five times its own height in a single bound.
  22. Some cats have survived falls of over 65 feet (20 meters), due largely to their “righting reflex.” The eyes and balance organs in the inner ear tell it where it is in space so the cat can land on its feet. Even cats without a tail have this ability.
  23. cat rub
    A cat rubs against people to mark them as their territory

    A cat rubs against people not only to be affectionate but also to mark out its territory with scent glands around its face. The tail area and paws also carry the cat’s scent.

  24. Researchers are unsure exactly how a cat purrs. Most veterinarians believe that a cat purrs by vibrating vocal folds deep in the throat. To do this, a muscle in the larynx opens and closes the air passage about 25 times per second.
  25. When a family cat died in ancient Egypt, family members would mourn by shaving off their eyebrows. They also held elaborate funerals during which they drank wine and beat their breasts. The cat was embalmed with a sculpted wooden mask and the tiny mummy was placed in the family tomb or in a pet cemetery with tiny mummies of mice.
  26. In 1888, more than 300,000 mummified cats were found an Egyptian cemetery. They were stripped of their wrappings and carted off to be used by farmers in England and the U.S. for fertilizer.
  27. Most cats give birth to a litter of between one and nine kittens. The largest known litter ever produced was 19 kittens, of which 15 survived.
  28. Smuggling a cat out of ancient Egypt was punishable by death. Phoenician traders eventually succeeded in smuggling felines, which they sold to rich people in Athens and other important cities.
  29. The earliest ancestor of the modern cat lived about 30 million years ago. Scientists called it the Proailurus, which means “first cat” in Greek. The group of animals that pet cats belong to emerged around 12 million years ago.
  30. The biggest wildcat today is the Siberian Tiger. It can be more than 12 feet (3.6 m) long (about the size of a small car) and weigh up to 700 pounds (317 kg).
  31. The smallest wildcat today is the Black-footed cat. The females are less than 20 inches (50 cm) long and can weigh as little as 2.5 lbs (1.2 kg).
  32. Many Egyptians worshipped the goddess Bast, who had a woman’s body and a cat’s head.
  33. Mohammed loved cats and reportedly his favorite cat, Muezza, was a tabby. Legend says that tabby cats have an “M” for Mohammed on top of their heads because Mohammad would often rest his hand on the cat’s head.
  34. While many parts of Europe and North America consider the black cat a sign of bad luck, in Britain and Australia, black cats are considered lucky.
  35. The most popular pedigreed cat is the Persian cat, followed by the Main Coon cat and the Siamese cat.
  36. The smallest pedigreed cat is a Singapura, which can weigh just 4 lbs (1.8 kg), or about five large cans of cat food. The largest pedigreed cats are Maine Coon cats, which can weigh 25 lbs (11.3 kg), or nearly twice as much as an average cat weighs.
  37. Siamese  cross eyed
    Some Siamese cats are cross-eyed to compensate for abnormal optic wiring

    Some Siamese cats appear cross-eyed because the nerves from the left side of the brain go to mostly the right eye and the nerves from the right side of the brain go mostly to the left eye. This causes some double vision, which the cat tries to correct by “crossing” its eyes.

  38. Researchers believe the word “tabby” comes from Attabiyah, a neighborhood in Baghdad, Iraq. Tabbies got their name because their striped coats resembled the famous wavy patterns in the silk produced in this city.
  39. Cats hate the water because their fur does not insulate well when it’s wet. The Turkish Van, however, is one cat that likes swimming. Bred in central Asia, its coat has a unique texture that makes it water resistant.
  40. The Egyptian Mau is probably the oldest breed of cat. In fact, the breed is so ancient that its name is the Egyptian word for “cat.”
  41. The costliest cat ever is named Little Nicky, who cost his owner $50,000. He is a clone of an older cat.
  42. A cat usually has about 12 whiskers on each side of its face.
  43. A cat’s eyesight is both better and worse than humans. It is better because cats can see in much dimmer light and they have a wider peripheral view. It’s worse because they don’t see color as well as humans do. Scientists believe grass appears red to cats.
  44. Spanish-Jewish folklore recounts that Adam’s first wife, Lilith, became a black vampire cat, sucking the blood from sleeping babies. This may be the root of the superstition that a cat will smother a sleeping baby or suck out the child’s breath.
  45. Perhaps the most famous comic cat is the Cheshire Cat in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. With the ability to disappear, this mysterious character embodies the magic and sorcery historically associated with cats.
  46. In the original Italian version of Cinderella, the benevolent fairy godmother figure was a cat.
  47. Cat Detective
    Two Siamese cats discovered microphones hidden by Russian spies in Holland’s embassy in Moscow

    In Holland’s embassy in Moscow, Russia, the staff noticed that the two Siamese cats kept meowing and clawing at the walls of the building. Their owners finally investigated, thinking they would find mice. Instead, they discovered microphones hidden by Russian spies. The cats heard the microphones when they turned on.

  48. The little tufts of hair in a cat’s ear that help keep out dirt direct sounds into the ear, and insulate the ears are called “ear furnishings.”
  49. The ability of a cat to find its way home is called “psi-traveling.” Experts think cats either use the angle of the sunlight to find their way or that cats have magnetized cells in their brains that act as compasses.
  50. Isaac Newton invented the cat flap. Newton was experimenting in a pitch-black room. Spithead, one of his cats, kept opening the door and wrecking his experiment. The cat flap kept both Newton and Spithead happy.
  51. The world’s rarest coffee, Kopi Luwak, comes from Indonesia where a wildcat known as the luwak lives. The cat eats coffee berries and the coffee beans inside pass through the stomach. The beans are harvested from the cat’s dung heaps and then cleaned and roasted. Kopi Luwak sells for about $500 for a 450 g (1 lb) bag.
  52. A cat’s jaw can’t move sideways, so a cat can’t chew large chunks of food.
  53. A cat almost never meows at another cat, mostly just humans. Cats typically will spit, purr, and hiss at other cats.
  54. A cat’s back is extremely flexible because it has up to 53 loosely fitting vertebrae. Humans only have 34.
  55. cat face to face
    Many cat owners think their cats can read their minds

    Approximately 1/3 of cat owners think their pets are able to read their minds.

  56. All cats have claws, and all except the cheetah sheath them when at rest.
  57. Two members of the cat family are distinct from all others: the clouded leopard and the cheetah. The clouded leopard does not roar like other big cats, nor does it groom or rest like small cats. The cheetah is unique because it is a running cat; all others are leaping cats. They are leaping cats because they slowly stalk their prey and then leap on it.
  58. A cat lover is called an Ailurophilia (Greek: cat+lover).
  59. In Japan, cats are thought to have the power to turn into super spirits when they die. This may be because according to the Buddhist religion, the body of the cat is the temporary resting place of very spiritual people.
  60. Most cats had short hair until about 100 years ago, when it became fashionable to own cats and experiment with breeding.
  61. Cats have 32 muscles that control the outer ear (humans have only 6). A cat can independently rotate its ears 180 degrees.
  62. cat sleeping
    During the nearly 18 hours a day that kittens sleep, an important growth hormone is released

    One reason that kittens sleep so much is because a growth hormone is released only during sleep.

  63. Cats have about 130,000 hairs per square inch (20,155 hairs per square centimeter).
  64. The heaviest cat on record is Himmy, a Tabby from Queensland, Australia. He weighed nearly 47 pounds (21 kg). He died at the age of 10.
  65. The oldest cat on record was Crème Puff from Austin, Texas, who lived from 1967 to August 6, 2005, three days after her 38th birthday. A cat typically can live up to 20 years, which is equivalent to about 96 human years.
  66. The lightest cat on record is a blue point Himalayan called Tinker Toy, who weighed 1 pound, 6 ounces (616 g). Tinker Toy was 2.75 inches (7 cm) tall and 7.5 inches (19 cm) long.
  67. The tiniest cat on record is Mr. Pebbles, a 2-year-old cat that weighed 3 lbs (1.3 k) and was 6.1 inches (15.5 cm) high.
  68. A commemorative tower was built in Scotland for a cat named Towser, who caught nearly 30,000 mice in her lifetime.
  69. In the 1750s, Europeans introduced cats into the Americas to control pests.
  70. The first cat show was organized in 1871 in London. Cat shows later became a worldwide craze.
  71. The first cartoon cat was Felix the Cat in 1919. In 1940, Tom and Jerry starred in the first theatrical cartoon “Puss Gets the Boot.” In 1981 Andrew Lloyd Weber created the musical Cats, based on T.S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats.
  72. The normal body temperature of a cat is between 100.5 ° and 102.5 °F. A cat is sick if its temperature goes below 100 ° or above 103 °F.
  73. A cat has 230 bones in its body. A human has 206. A cat has no collarbone, so it can fit through any opening the size of its head.
  74. A cat’s nose pad is ridged with a unique pattern, just like the fingerprint of a human.
  75. If they have ample water, cats can tolerate temperatures up to 133 °F.
  76. Foods that should not be given to cats include onions, garlic, green tomatoes, raw potatoes, chocolate, grapes, and raisins. Though milk is not toxic, it can cause an upset stomach and gas. Tylenol and aspirin are extremely toxic to cats, as are many common houseplants. Feeding cats dog food or canned tuna that’s for human consumption can cause malnutrition.
  77. A 2007 Gallup poll revealed that both men and women were equally likely to own a cat.
  78. A cat’s heart beats nearly twice as fast as a human heart, at 110 to 140 beats a minute.
  79. cat paws
    Cat’s sweat only through their paws

    Cats don’t have sweat glands over their bodies like humans do. Instead, they sweat only through their paws.

  80. In just seven years, a single pair of cats and their offspring could produce a staggering total of 420,000 kittens.
  81. Relative to its body size, the clouded leopard has the biggest canines of all animals’ canines. Its dagger-like teeth can be as long as 1.8 inches (4.5 cm).
  82. Cats spend nearly 1/3 of their waking hours cleaning themselves.
  83. Grown cats have 30 teeth. Kittens have about 26 temporary teeth, which they lose when they are about 6 months old.
  84. A cat called Dusty has the known record for the most kittens. She had more than 420 kittens in her lifetime.
  85. The largest cat breed is the Ragdoll. Male Ragdolls weigh between 12 and 20 lbs (5.4-9.0 k). Females weigh between 10 and 15 lbs (4.5-6.8 k).
  86. Cats are extremely sensitive to vibrations. Cats are said to detect earthquake tremors 10 or 15 minutes before humans can.
  87. In contrast to dogs, cats have not undergone major changes during their domestication process.
  88. A female cat is called a queen or a molly.
  89. In the 1930s, two Russian biologists discovered that color change in Siamese kittens depend on their body temperature. Siamese cats carry albino genes that work only when the body temperature is above 98° F. If these kittens are left in a very warm room, their points won’t darken and they will stay a creamy white.
  90. There are up to 60 million feral cats in the United States alone.
  91. The oldest cat to give birth was Kitty who, at the age of 30, gave birth to two kittens. During her life, she gave birth to 218 kittens.
  92. The most traveled cat is Hamlet, who escaped from his carrier while on a flight. He hid for seven weeks behind a pane. By the time he was discovered, he had traveled nearly 373,000 miles (600,000 km).
  93. The most expensive cat was an Asian Leopard cat (ALC)-Domestic Shorthair (DSH) hybrid named Zeus. Zeus, who is 90% ALC and 10% DSH, has an asking price of £100,000 ($154,000).
  94. The cat who holds the record for the longest non-fatal fall is Andy. He fell from the 16th floor of an apartment building (about 200 ft/.06 km) and survived.
  95. The richest cat is Blackie who was left 15 million by his owner, Ben Rea.
  96. The claws on the cat’s back paws aren’t as sharp as the claws on the front paws because the claws in the back don’t retract and, consequently, become worn.